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BigDarsh

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Join date : 2015-12-03

PostSubject: BTU Terminology.   Mon Dec 07, 2015 10:34 am

Brawler's definition:

It's up to you to have your own definition of what is a brawler but here are few questions I asked to myself long time ago.

  • What is the difference between space control and crowd control?
  • If projectile is space control tool what is a crowd control tool?
  • How can you control a crowd without controlling space in the same time?

Here is the only answer I found. If I make my opponent fall to the floor, I control a part of the crowd, without controlling space. Maybe this is why bow and guns exist (to control zone) and why martial arts exist (to control people).

My Brawler's definition (wether 2D or 3D) relies on that simple concept. A Beat Em Up without critical moves (ie: knockdown or launcher or knockaway) is a shooter without bullets. To me, Spartan X is like Shinobi, Altered Beast, and Gouls n Goblins. An action game without critical move. Every video games related to Irem's Spartan X's battle system (1984) are negate in this terminology since they only feature space control tools.

  • Can you make a shooter without critical move in 2015? Sure.
  • Can you make a shooter without projectile in 2015? No.
  • Can you make a brawler without projectile in 2015? Yes.
  • Can you make a brawler without critical move in 2015? No.

drunken

BTU Terminology

Here is a BTU Terminology I will use for all my articles for the sake of clarity. It is designed to be used as a "dictionary". There is nothing official in that Terminology since the industry loves to give 10 differents names to a same mechanics in order to avoid business troubles and give identity to their own video games in the process. If you notice any mistakes (date, wrong first title to introduce the mechanics), or missing important concepts, feel free to feedback in the topic.

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Displacement Related:

Walk, Vertical Jump, Forward Jump are self explainatory. Rear Jump too.

Dash vs Run: Dash is very restrictive (start up, lenght, recovery). Run can be diagonal or linear, infinite or limited, but the player has some control on it by holding a button or a direction.

Hyper Jump: A secondary jump with higher curve. Run or Dash is required to perform it in most games, but not all. It can give access to alternate moveset (or not) depending on the video game. It might have been created in 1989 by SEGA for Golden Axe.

Wall Jump: A situational jump which permits the player to bounce off a wall (not the edge of the screen). Capcom drifted it in 1989 from Renegade's wall bounce kick (1986). The Wall Jump can give access to a new moveset (or not) depending on the video games.

Double/Triple Jump: The ability to start a new jump from a prior jump. Jaleco created it in 1992 for Brawl Brothers (Rushing Beat Ran). It's a quite rare mechanics in 2D BTU, but not in modern brawlers or fighting games.


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Chain and Attack related:

Regular Move: An attack with hitstun property.

Critical Move: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. An attack which permits to make the opponent fall on the floor (First BTU according to my definition). Stun can be required (or not) to perfom it depending on the games. The very first critical move was a knockdown, but knockaway, launch into the air, and all these kinds of effects are critical.

Stun / Dizzy: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. It's a special state for enemies. It can permit the player to trigger new moves (critical moves, grapple) or not, depending on the video games. It can even be enemy specific in a said game.

String Combo: Created by Tecmo in 1988 for Ninja Gaiden Arcade. The previous move of the chain does not have to connect in order to perform the next one. It will be refined by SEGA in 1993 for Virtua Fighter in giving different properties to each move. The String Combo is the standard of all 3D Brawlers.

Target Combo: Created by Capcom in December 1989 for Final Fight. The previous move of the chain must connect in order to perform the next one. The Target Combo is one of the Standard of 2D Brawlers, but not the only one.

Rear Attack: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. An attack which is directed in the back of the character.

Emergency Escape Move (EEM): Created by Capcom in December 1989 for Final Fight. Named Mega Crash in CPS Games, it has lot of different names, but the concept is the same. Trading HP for performing a fully invincible 360° attack with critical property or free of charge if the move doesn't connect.

Command Move: The very first might have been created by Jaleco in 1991 for 64th Street. It's a stand-alone signature move with a special input. Forward +A, Down Up +A and Forward Forward +A are the most common inputs. They are critical moves for the very wild majority. Not to be mistaken with Dash Attack.

Dash Attack: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. It's a move only avaible while the character is dashing or running. They are critical moves for the very wild majority.


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Air Related:

In Place Jump Attack (IPJ ATK): Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. An attack avaible from a vertical jump (static).

Jump Attack (or Jump Kick): It Might have been created by Technos Japan. An attack avaible from a dynamic jump (dynamic). It's difficult to know which is the first BTU who featured this, but Renegade's Flying Kick is the ancestor. Feedback appreciated.

Jump-in Attack (Jump-in ATK): Created in 1989 by Capcom (Okamoto) for Final Fight but stemmed from Capcom's Street Fighter (Nishiyama, 1987). An attack avaible from the air with no critical property (enemy does not fall down) which permits to start combos from the air.

Dive Attack: Created in 1989 by Konami for TMNT Arcade (aka TMNT II Nes). An attack avaible from the air which breaks the jumping curve providing flexibility to the player's air game in the process.

Air Throw: Created in 1988 by Tecmo for Ninja Gaiden Arcade. A throw avaible form a jump (air player vs standing opponent), the famous guillotine. It will be drifted by Capcom in 1992 for Warriors of Fate (air player vs air opponent).


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Grapple related:

Grapple: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. A move which paralyzes the opponent giving access to an alternet moveset (grapple moveset). Stun the opponent first can be required (or not) depending on the video games.

Back Grapple: Created in 1987 by Technos Japan for Double Dragon. Same as front grapple but from the back of the opponent. The very first back grapple moveset is more than likely SEGA's Bare Knuckle I (1991).

Vaulting: Created by SEGA in 1991 for Bare Knuckle. The ability to switch grapple (front <=> back). The number of vaulting is limited to 2 before releasing the opponent in most video games.

Jumping Grapple: Created in 1989 by Capcom for Final Fight. The possibility to jump with an opponent locked into a grapple.

Walking Grapple: Created in 1989 by Capcom for Final Fight. The possibility to walk with an opponent locked into a grapple.

Double Grapple: Created in 1992 by Konami for Batman Returns (SNES), but stemmed from Technos Japan's The Combatribes (1990). The possibility to lock a second opponent into a grapple.

Flurry: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. A chain of attacks finishing with a critical move avaible in the grapple moveset. Knee bash is the most common visual for that mechanics.

Power Blow: Created in 1989 by Technos Japan for Double Dragon II Nes. A stand-alone critical move avaible in the grapple moveset.

Submission: Capcom and SEGA both implemented it in a BTU's grapple moveset in the same era (1992, Bare Knuckle II and Warriors of Fate). Both stemmed it from Capcom's Street Fighter II (1991). The possibility to apply a submission to an opponent locked into a grapple.


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Throw related:

Important:

  • Stun the opponent first can be required (or not) to perform throw depending on the video games.
  • Grapple the opponent first can be required (or not) to perform throw depending on the video games.


Toss: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. It's a move which permits to throw the enemy away. The opponent can be use as a projectile (or not), the opponent can throw escape (or not) depending on the video games.

Slam: Created in 1989 by Capcom for Final Fight. It's a move which permits to slam the enemy on the ground. The opponent might rebound on the floor (or not), depending on the video games.

Jumping Throw: Created in 1989 by Capcom for Final Fight. This mechanics is often tied with the Jumping Grapple mechanics but not always. The very first jumping throw was a jumping grapple slam (Haggar's Piledriver) but it can be a jumping grapple toss too.

Giant Swing: Created by Technos Japan as a ground mechanics feature, it will be find later in some grapple movesets of other studios (SEGA, Capcom, WinkySoft). It's an "upgraded toss". The character swing the opponent before throwing him away. The opponent can be used as a projectile in most video games featuring that mechanics.


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Ground related:

Pin and Pummel: Created in 1986 by Technos Japan for Renegade. Self explanatory.

Ground Lift: Created in 1989 by Technos Japan for River City Ransom. The possibility to lift an opponent lying on the ground. Most of the games permit to perform a throw afterward.

QTE Stomp: Created in 1989 by Konami for Crime Fighters. The ability to stomp an opponent as long as he's lying on the floor. Many visuals has been used for that mechanics (punch, knee, claw swipe, butt drop and more). It will be drifted in later games to permit the player to use the QTE stomp from a distance (auto-lock jumping stomp).

OTG (Off The Ground): OTG is the ability to start or extend combo against an opponent lying on the floor using the physics of the engine as a core element of the ground game. It's hard to define who is the creator since games like Konami's Violent Storm (summer 1993) did not disable opponent's hurtbox to regular attack after a knockdown. This permited the player to connect regular moves on them (as long as the hitbox reached it) but without physics aftermath. The very first modern OTG (involving physics) in BTU might be Capcom's Alien vs Predator (Springs, 1994).


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Defense related:

Hit Cancel: The ability to perfom an attack while being hit/combo. Capcom's Mega Crash might be the first attack with Hit Cancel property.

Block/Guard: The ability to block attack through a guard mechanics. Technos Japan's River City Ransom has a random guard mechanics (based on RPG's stats), Irem's Blade Master (early 1991?) and Capcom's Kings of Dragon (summer 1991) might be the firsts to feature proper guard mechanics (instant block / timing based / QTE), Capcom's D&D Tower of Doom (late 1993) might be the first manual guard.

Evasive Displacement: It can be partially invincible or wholy or not at all. It can have different visuals (back dash, back hop, back roll, side roll, side step or whatever). Capcom's Knights of the Round (november 1991) introduced that mechanics (emergency retreat).

Back Grapple Escape: Created by Technos Japan in 1986 for Renegade. The ability to escape from an opponent's back grapple lock. It can be either an attack or a throw.

Throw Escape: Created by SEGA in 1991 for Bare Knuckle. The ability to safe land and to negate damage from a throw. Enemy can benefit from that mechanics too. Hachoo! (Jaleco, 1989) featured Recovery Roll after being thrown which did not negate damage.

Ground Recovery: Capcom's Final Fight might be the first to introduce that concept. The ability to get up faster to avoid further trouble after being knock down. Shake joysticks and/or button is the input to do so most of the time.

Recovery Roll/Attack: The "upgraded" ground recovery. It permits to counter act in the process (with an evasive move or an attack). It is not as "button mashy". It's quite rare in the 2D BTU medium. Hachoo! (Jaleco, 1989) featured Recovery Roll after being thrown which did not negate damage.


Last edited by BigDarsh on Thu Jan 07, 2016 10:03 pm; edited 8 times in total
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